This is a Schedule used in the United Kingdom. George Alexander Scott, an Official Referee and , a surveyor invented it for  for use in building disputes. Scott Schedules are a tool of case management. Over the years this has gradually been adapted, in various forms, to other types of litigation, who invented the tool for use in litigation. It is most often used in the Technology  and Construction court, Family Courts and Civil Courts. It has no set structure in civil litigation as it will depend on the case and the nature of the allegations as to what information will assist the court.

Family Law

In family cases, Scott schedules can be used to good effect particularly in cases involving domestic violence, injuries to children & the allocation of chattels in ancillary relief or indeed, generally to set out threshold findings sought. The precise contents of the schedule will vary according to the case type but essentially the schedule should give each allegation or item a number, summarise each party’s case on each finding and cross reference to any relevant evidence in the bundle. There could also be a final column for the court to record its findings on the allegations although it may be easier for the court to incorporate the schedule into a judgment in which the findings are recorded.
The schedules list the allegations made by one party and the other party’s response to those allegations, the responses citing the relevant evidence in the court bundle upon which the party seeks to rely.

The Judges have indicated that if proper Scott schedules were not prepared when ordered the court would be likely to adjourn the case for the work to be done, with possible cost penalties.

The layout of a Scott schedule for a finding of fact hearing needs to be a table with 5 columns:

1. number
2. brief description of allegation together with alleged date of incident
3. Alleged victim’s evidence [ie identify if Applicant or Respondent] – ie very brief resume of evidence supporting allegation and page number references to all supporting evidence including where referred to in witness statements
4. Alleged perpetrator’s evidence [identify if Applicant or Respondent]- this should be left empty for the other side to complete
5. Judges’ findings – this should be left empty

Try to concentrate on the most important incidents – courts never keen in dealing with more than 6-12 allegations

Family Law Examples

Layout Eample 1

IN THE  [Type in the name of the court]                                                                                                Case No  [Type in the case number] 

 

BETWEEN:

 [Type in the name of the Applicant] 

Applicant

-and-

[Type in the name of the Respondent]

Respondent

 

 

SCOTT SCHEDULE

 

Alleged Allegations

[If the allegations are made against the applicant, type Applicant's, if against the Respondent, type Respondent's] Comments

Findings

Layout Example 2

IN THE  [Type in the name of the court]                                                                                                Case No  [Type in the case number] 

 

BETWEEN:

 [Type in the name of the Applicant] 

Applicant

-and-

[Type in the name of the Respondent]

Respondent

 

 

SCOTT SCHEDULE

 

No

Date

Ref

Alleged Allegations

Party

Comments

Findings

Construction Law

This is what the Technology & Construction Court guidance says:

5.6.1 It can sometimes be appropriate for elements of the claim, or any Part 20 claim, to be set out by way of a Scott Schedule. For example, claims involving a final account or numerous alleged defects or items of disrepair, may be best formulated in this way, which then allows for a detailed response from the defendant. Sometimes, even where all the damage has been caused by one event, such as a fire, it can be helpful for the individual items of loss and damage to be set out in a Scott Schedule. The secret of an effective Scott Schedule lies in the information that is to be provided. This is defined by the column headings. The judge may give directions for the relevant column headings for any Schedule ordered by the court. It is

Examples

Property name:

Parties – Client: Builder:

(a) Basic Version

Serial No. Item Claimant Defendant Judge’s columns
Valuation Price Valuation Price Valuation/comments Price
1. [This should set out the item being claimed – ideally with reference to the date of the instruction and then the issue - e.g. Letter of xx/xx/xx – re-plastering of rear wall] [In this column you set out how you value the work – for example, 3 hours at £50 per hour; materials £20] [In the previous example this would be £170] [This is where the client should insert their response ...] [and here the amount they propose]

 

(b)Defects Schedule

Serial No. Description of defect Claimant Defendant Judge’s columns
Term of contract and specification breached Remedial work done/required Cost of remedial work Replies/comments on breach of contract Replies/comments on remedial work and cost Comments Price
1.

 

(c)Delays Schedule

Serial No. Delaying event Claimant Defendant Judge’s columns
Effect of the event Total delay Description of disruption Comments Comments Price
1.

 

 

 

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